Toi Whakaari: New Zealand Drama School http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz Toi Whakaari: New Zealand Drama School, performing arts courses in acting, design, costume construction and arts management Fri, 23 Jun 2017 02:59:58 +0000 en-NZ hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 Term Two comes to a close http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/term-two-comes-close/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/term-two-comes-close/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 00:55:25 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=12364 And just like that – what seems like only moments since we left Manutuke and Marae Noho at the end of Term One – Term Two is also over. It...

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And just like that – what seems like only moments since we left Manutuke and Marae Noho at the end of Term One – Term Two is also over.

It has been an extremely busy one for the school. Term Two holds two externally focused productions as well as several other major pieces of collaborative work that makes powerful demands on students and tutors alike.

Our two productions – The Antigone Sound and Black Confetti – closed on Wednesday night after heroic production processes and a great response from audiences, especially large groups from local schools.

The Antigone Sound

Second year designers and actors along with managers and costumiers, collaborated on a project we call “Mise-en-Scène” in which a scene from a well-known film is re-created multiple times with different combinations of actors and designers.

Investing highly in crew and camera and working hard for feel and mood in design and not realism, students and teachers have used the screenplay of American Hustle as a basis to explore making and shooting. They converted the Te Whaea theatre into a sound studio for four weeks and then did in situ tests with design and acting prior to crew arriving. They then adjusted their approach based on what they discovered and took the realisation to the next level. Then they brought in crew.

The sequences produced real and meaningful challenges for crew and performers (and for the staff leading). The professionals, who came in, loved the approach. The DOP said it was his “dream job” to work on the takes again and again without any cynicism in the room. Unlike the two productions, the finished work is not for the public but to provide a rich and intensive learning experience for the students.

On the move! #bts Mise en Scene film project @toi_whakaari

A post shared by Toi Design (@toi_design) on

Another Design project (in collaboration with students from the rest of the school) which will see the light of day is the annual “Music Video” project which also took three weeks of construction and shooting this term. For the first time the project featured the active collaboration of a local musician, Kåmåndi, who provided a track for the shoot. 2015 Design graduate Charley Draper returned to the school to direct and ace cinematographer Ivars Berzins photographed.

The students each get a week to produce a cut of their own from the raw footage before Charley comes up with a finished product that we can share with the world. Students worked alongside our new head of Set & Props, Francis Gallop, to construct backdrops, models and miniatures for the project.

As well as the internal work of the school, we also looked outwards. Marketing & Communications Manager Dan Slevin spent two weeks in Sweden recruiting international students and telling the story of the school to anyone who would listen. Head of Costume, Kaarin Macaulay, judged two more regional Brother Cosplay Contest for the Armageddon fantasy, sci-fi and comic book conventions in Tauranga and Wellington. We also had a popular booth at both events.

Our costumiers also went to Palmerston North for the opening of Te Manawa’s new exhibition about New Zealand entertainment icons, The Topp Twins. One of the features of the exhibition is a space where you can dress up as some of the Twins’ famous characters and our students made the costumes for that section.

“It’s been a while since we wore these, Ken!“
‘Too right Ken, I hope they still fit!” – The Topp Twins try on the costumes we made for the Te Manawa exhibition about their lives.

We were also able to celebrate the successes of many graduates this term. On 24 May, grad Rima Te Wiata (Acting, 1982) went to Government House to receive an MNZM from the Governor-General for services to film and television. Rima is one of New Zealand’s most loved actors and with the success of Hunt for the Wilderpeople in 2016, audiences around the world got to enjoy her unique talent.

Not long after that, the 2017 Queens Birthday honours were announced and no less than four Toi graduates were recognised. Actor Rachel House (graduated 1993), also from Hunt for the Wilderpeople coincidentally but also one of the voices on the hugely successful Disney animated film Moana, was awarded an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit; actor, broadcaster and producer Peter Hayden (graduated 1973), screenwriter and producer Rachel Lang (graduated 1982) and author and screenwriter Emily Perkins (graduated 1989) were made Members of the New Zealand Order of Merit. Those last three demonstrate how an acting education at Toi Whakaari can lead to influential, fulfilling and rewarding careers in other areas of the arts.

Other graduate successes we celebrated this term include the 20th anniversary of the founding of Indian Ink, a theatre company whose first production was the development of a Toi Whakaari monologue by Jacob Rajan. Since then, the company has have performed acclaimed productions to many thousands of people around the world and has two shows running concurrently in Australia and New Zealand at the moment.

Jacob Rajan in his play The Guru of Chai for Indian Ink.

Two graduates – Jessica Sanderson (Design, 2009) and Jodie Hillock (Acting, 2006) – had short films funded by the New Zealand Film Commission in May. Composer and designer (and 2005 ET grad) Thomas Press, had an interactive light and sound experience, Lightbells, installed in Aotea Square in Auckland. Many graduates were involved in the Kia Mau Festival in Wellington as well as the Matariki Festival in Auckland, including a brand new play by 2009 acting grad Cian Elyse Waitī, Te Puhi about the first Māori Miss New Zealand in the 1960s.

Six grads: Victoria Abbott (Acting, 2011), Awhina-Rose Ashby (Acting, 2012), Miriama McDowell (Acting, 2002), Te Aihe Butler (ET, 2014), Owen McCarthy (Design, 2014) and Poppy Serano (Design, 2014); and one current student (Katrina George) featured in Red Leap’s new production, Kororareka: The Ballad of Maggie Flynn which has sold out it’s Northland tour after opening in Auckland.

2007 Design graduate Hermione Flynn designed a costume for legendary performance artist Marina Abramovich and her latest VR project in collaboration with Jeff Koons and Studio Olafur Eliasson.

Term Two has been epic. Everyone in the school has worked so hard they deserve a breather for a few weeks. And the graduate successes we have been celebrating will inspire them to keep going, and to forge a path of leadership and success in the industry here and internationally. See you all on 17 July for Open Week.

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The first wānanga for Ruku Pō http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/first-wananga-ruku-po/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/first-wananga-ruku-po/#respond Tue, 28 Mar 2017 02:18:47 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=12062 Ruku Pō is a leadership initiative that dives (ruku) into the potential of ‘subjective’ engagement, as an effective response to the chaotic, complex and as yet unknown (pō) ‘objective’ challenges...

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Ruku Pō is a leadership initiative that dives (ruku) into the potential of ‘subjective’ engagement, as an effective response to the chaotic, complex and as yet unknown (pō) ‘objective’ challenges of our time.

The Ruku Pō programme, divided into six wānanga, is based at Manutuke Marae and draws on the specific indigenous frames of the tangata whenua, Rongowhakaata, to explore marae approaches of ‘meeting’ including; formal orientation, reading the core of context of place, and aligning action while maintaining the deeply indigenous perspective of ‘wholeness’. The key is enabling difference to be met and revealing the potential of group. Participants are guided to lead and translate these approaches through testing in their own work contexts.

Ruku Pō and kindred Wellington-based programme Ruku Ao meet while observing a practical translation of these frames into the arts-based educational model used by Toi Whakaari.

2017 marks the second iteration of this programme facilitated by Teina and Ngapaki Moetara.

 

FIRST WĀNANGA

The first wānanga occurred at Manutuke Marae from 3–5 March with a group of 15 participants, half of which come from the local iwi area. Three Toi Whakaari staff are participating this year.

Ways of Meeting

A kaupapa for this wānanga was “The Face of the Challenge – New Zealand and her ways of meeting” and the invitation was to consider how we meet drawing on Rongowhakaata tikanga frames and the model inherent in the metaphorical and physical spaces of the marae atea and entering the wharenui. We encountered practically the concepts of tū and rongo through the group activity of Charades!

We met each other in pepeha and by leading the group into our practice through considering the questions, What is our work in the world? How my work connects to my identity? and What stops this connection from happening? In effect what is/are the source(s) that sustain me and my work? Strengths and vulnerabilities of authentic self were revealed and layers of relationship and connections are starting to build a working culture where relating through sharing and hunting (rapua) to make sense of the sharing is the work of the group, where risking challenge with safety means bringing my best to enable your best – growing our capacity together.

Coming Back to Source and the Foundations of Tikanga

Coming Back to Source was practically experienced in a field trip to the ‘wellspring’ of Te Arai, the awa that passes through Manutuke. From the headwaters of this stream as it emerges from the largest remnant of native bush in the region, Gisborne City draws its municipal water supply. Ironically Manutuke has only just had access to municipal water in the last few years. But by the time the awa reaches Manutuke it is so nutrient polluted that it is un-swimmable and barely sustains viable fish populations.

The murky river downstream (photo Simone Gabriel)

 

Questions as I reflect on the wānanga

What are the strong foundations needed for tikanga to operate effectively? What is the relation between foundation (tūāpapa) and source?

How do I identify the most effective, most authentic source? Is it serving me well? What skills strengthen source?

Brian prepares breakfast (photo Simone Gabriel)

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Toi Whakaari welcomes 2017 Toi Film directors http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/toi-whakaari-welcomes-2017-toi-film-directors/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/toi-whakaari-welcomes-2017-toi-film-directors/#respond Wed, 15 Mar 2017 02:02:19 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=11942 Toi is pleased to announce that this year’s Toi Films are to be helmed by three celebrated Kiwi directors: Florian Habicht, Jonathan King and Michelle Savill. Every year, Toi Whakaari students...

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Toi is pleased to announce that this year’s Toi Films are to be helmed by three celebrated Kiwi directors: Florian Habicht, Jonathan King and Michelle Savill.

Every year, Toi Whakaari students collaborate with screen industry professionals to produce a suite of new short films: showcasing the talent of the student body and giving those students professional-equivalent experience on high quality productions.

Toi Film 2017 directors: Jonathan King, Florian Habicht and Michelle Savill

 

In recent years Toi Film has worked alongside directors Louis Sutherland (2014) and James Ashcroft (2015 & 2016) to make a series of shorts that have gone on to screen on Rialto Channel as well as online outlets. Traditionally, the films also premiere at Wellington’s Embassy Theatre during graduation week in November.

Third year actors take on most of the roles in the films and production design is handled by students or recent graduates from the Bachelor of Design (Stage & Screen). Costume construction students wrangle wardrobe and performing arts management students become production managers, assistant directors and other vital behind-the-scenes roles.

Toi Film producer, senior acting tutor Vaughan Slinn, says the experience is not only important learning for students: “The directors we work with on Toi Film love having the opportunity to create something quickly, without having to jump through the hoops of a traditional funding application process. In many cases, that freedom opens up creative possibilities that wouldn’t always be available. And they love working with the energy of talented young students.”

Toi Film in 2017 will produce six films. Florian Habicht is writing and directing a long short with the working title High Tide to be shot in Auckland. Jonathan King is directing two films, An Arm and a Leg (written by Jonathan) and Saturn Sheets (written by Rosie Howell). Michelle Savill is making three vignettes that will play together under the (working) title Bats. All the productions are well-advanced and shooting is scheduled to commence on 27 March.

3rd year actor Christel Chapman in 2014 Toi Film “Carcass” (directed by Louis Sutherland, costume design by 3rd year designer Marama Beamish, art direction by 3rd year designer Rosie Remmerswaal).

 

Florian Habicht is an award-winning (and prolific) filmmaker who is best-known for the alternative documentaries, Kaikohe Demolition and Rubbings From a Live Man as well as the New York-based ‘participatory’ feature Love Story and the 2014 collaboration with Jarvis Cocker on the history of his band, Pulp: a Story of Life, Death & Supermarkets.

Jonathan King has been an active New Zealand filmmaker for more than 20 years. He directed music videos, TV commercials and short films, before writing and directing his debut feature Black Sheep – which remains one of New Zealand’s biggest-selling feature films. He co-wrote supernatural thriller The Tattooist before co-writing, producing and directing a film adaptation of New Zealand classic Under the Mountain, starring Sam Neill. He followed that with Realiti, an independent arthouse sci-fi which he produced and directed.

Michelle Savill’s short film Ellen is Leaving won the Best Narrative Short Film award at both the 2013 SXSW festival and the San Francisco International Film Festival as well as receiving nominations at Clermont-Ferrand, Chicago and Aspen. In 2011, Savill received the Script-to-Screen scholarship to work in the script development department of renowned New York production company Killer Films (led by producers Christine Vachon and Pam Koffler).

Cast and crew hard at work with director James Ashcroft on the 2015 Toi Film, “Let Down Your Hair”.

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Back to School for 2017 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/back-school-2017/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/back-school-2017/#respond Mon, 20 Feb 2017 23:21:31 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=11893 The 2017 school year is well and truly under way with our new students welcomed at an emotional pōwhiri at Te Whaea yesterday. Week One of term is an important...

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The 2017 school year is well and truly under way with our new students welcomed at an emotional pōwhiri at Te Whaea yesterday. Week One of term is an important period for us as we settle teina (new students) in to the school, get to know them and our second years get used to the role of tuakana (or older siblings) taking on more senior roles.

Click below for a gallery of images from the pōwhiri.

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Term One, Week Zero http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/term-one-week-0/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/term-one-week-0/#respond Thu, 16 Feb 2017 03:42:55 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=11697 On the first day we started with a welcome in the morning for our returning students, then an audience discussion with the makers of a Fringe show after lunch. The conversation...

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On the first day we started with a welcome in the morning for our returning students, then an audience discussion with the makers of a Fringe show after lunch. The conversation of the day has been about process, connection and working practice.


The returning students and staff reconnect after some time apart over summer. We all prepare for the year ahead by thinking about what tone or flavour we as a collective group want to show during week one, when we are joined by 45 new students.  We are thinking about the working culture and what we individually and collectively can build.

Next week starts with a pōwhiri for our new students. In the arts management department, the work it takes for people to work to their best is at the core of many of the principles. We will be thinking and seeing and testing how this welcome works to orientate the new students to us. It is also a read out of where we are at as a wider school group, and the work ahead.

First day selfie – Lisa Maule

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2016 Graduation Class Photos http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/2016-graduation-class-photos/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/2016-graduation-class-photos/#respond Tue, 29 Nov 2016 03:51:05 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=11608 Two weeks ago we waved goodbye to our 2016 graduate classes in Acting, Management, Design, Costume, Entertainment Technology and Directing. We wish them well as they start the next chapter...

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Two weeks ago we waved goodbye to our 2016 graduate classes in Acting, Management, Design, Costume, Entertainment Technology and Directing.

We wish them well as they start the next chapter of their careers. We will miss them.

Click below for more photos…

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Miranda Harcourt Q&A http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/miranda-harcourt-qa/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/miranda-harcourt-qa/#respond Mon, 14 Nov 2016 23:01:58 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=11583 Miranda Harcourt is an award-winning actor, director, writer and acting coach. A graduate of Toi Whakaari and former Head of Acting at the school, she now works as a screen-acting...

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Miranda Harcourt is an award-winning actor, director, writer and acting coach. A graduate of Toi Whakaari and former Head of Acting at the school, she now works as a screen-acting coach all over the world on projects including Bridge to Terabithia (Gabor Csupo), The Lovely Bones (Peter Jackson), Top of the Lake (Jane Campion) Lion and Mary Magdalene (Garth Davis).

Most recently Miranda co-directed feature film The Changeover alongside  Stuart McKenzie, who wrote the screenplay from Margaret Mahy’s acclaimed novel.

Amongst those she has coached, Miranda counts Nicole Kidman, Juliette Binoche, Anna Sophia Robb, Josh Hutcherson, Dev Patel as well as many others.

Miranda was at Toi earlier in the year working with the first year actors on “Actor in Relationship” and we talked to her about her approach to this and her work as an acting coach.

 

Miranda HarcourtHow has it been working with the first years over the past couple of weeks?

Really good, I have loved it. I think you go to any acting programme to pass through that culture in order to strengthen yourself for the future as a professional person. When you are working with first year students, they haven’t quite figured out what their future holds, whether they want to be actors or whether they want to be drama students.

You do see that some people are sharp in their focus and others are in doubt. That’s not a value judgement, you just have to take each person for where they are. I use a lot of game structures and a lot of analogies in my work which invite them to go, ‘OK, so what does this mean for me? We are playing this game to open up something about performance, so what is that?’ My job is to offer tools for every individual to discover for him or herself.

So sometimes I work with people who are extremely experienced and sometimes I am working with people who are just starting out. That’s good for me because I have to hold a lot of movement across that spectrum of experience. It makes me stay open.

What were you working with them when working on Actor in Relationship, what was the focus there?

It always changes, I like to devise the workshop according to what the group needs. But on this occasion the focus has been reverse the flow. I am asking them to realise through experience and through watching each other on camera, that it makes a magical difference when you truly play to that other person and relinquish your focus on your own performance. Suddenly it’s like a light goes on inside the performance.

Actors can see that in other people but it’s very difficult to then relinquish your own addiction to text. And your addiction to control, and your addiction to craft rather than spirit in performance.

I talk about the actor’s existential crisis — the actor forgets that he or she brings something unique simply by being. A lot of actors think that all they can offer is their craft but I don’t want to see craft, you know? Craft is useful but it’s only useful when it’s invisible.

You are able to make the awkwardness between two actors disappear using a lot of physical exercises, why do you think these work so well with actors?

For me it’s been a lifelong journey to get out of the intellect and into the body and using childhood games is a very quick way to do that.

Other people achieve this in different ways but I do it by using games in which two people have to solve a problem with each other. Clapping games are just two people who have got a problem to solve together. This works in accessing unselfconsciousness because they are both concentrating not on themselves but on each other and the problem they share. They are returning to the state of being a pre-teen, which is when, sociologically, clapping games are most prevalent.

I am also very interested in chemistry and how the body naturally produces drugs when exposed to different experiences. For example fear creates cortisol and adrenaline whereas oxytocin brings about feelings of contentment, relaxation, trust. All of those behaviours come from physical connections and experiences, they don’t come from saying to yourself “I must relax” or “I must trust the other person”. I ask people to embark on something simple and physical in order to be able to promote those behaviours.

Quantum physics also interests me — the new discoveries that are being made about relationship and the shifts and changes that happen in the space between people. I talk a lot about warming the space between actors and that’s not a metaphor or an analogy, that’s real. The space between people can be warmed and that’s what the camera loves to see.

I guess that’s what my work is about, finding those ways to warm the space — and to do it really fast because I usually work on film sets where time is a luxury! When I am on set I have to achieve a shift or change in less than two minutes, so the tools that I have developed are about going deep quickly and then safely exiting at the other end. I studied Drama Therapy at the Central School of Speech and Drama and many of the therapeutic tools I learnt there have found their way into my work.

And you work with children and teens as well so you must have to gauge what works for them as well?

Yes. For example, I wouldn’t use hug to connect with teenagers because I think it’s too much for them. It’s too challenging. Instead I would ask them to achieve the same outcome by standing back to back. I would still use physical closeness but I would change the nature of that exercise to suit that person, their age and stage.

When I was working in India last year on the film Lion, I learnt a cute little hand shake from the five-year-old playing the lead and I use that every day now as a connecting tool. He only spoke Hindi and I only spoke English but we still had a great connection. Another tool I use is Deaf Sign Language which I learnt for a play many years ago. That was awesomely useful in India!

What are you noticing in the first year actors at this stage in their training?

I think maybe here at Toi the orientation in the first year of study is that you find out what kind of learner you are and in discovering that you are equipped with strategies to move forward. Then you can enter the cut and thrust and difficulties of being in a fast-paced professional environment.

Sometimes actors can make discoveries about themselves in class –  and because it is a learning environment those should be valued as discoveries, not judged as mistakes. The Japanese concept Kintsukeroi is key to my work — that the light gets through the broken parts!

We did an exercise yesterday where I sent the actors away at the end of the day with these really brief scenes, like really brief scenes, just a single page in a big font and I was like, “Learn these for tomorrow and we are going to work on these scenes”.  I work with verbatim text a lot and so my expectation is that people respect the precision of the text. So if I say “Learn the text” that does not mean “Improvise your way through this scene”. It’s got a structure. My expectation is that people would have come back and learnt the structure.

So, if I find on camera that they haven’t learnt the structure, I’m like, “Right, that’s interesting. You haven’t learnt the structure and that’s ok, maybe that’s a choice or maybe you have a learning issue around reading or understanding the text.” There are all sorts of things that emerge in your first year of drama school that some people aren’t even aware of themselves. Some people discover that they are dyslexic and they never knew that. You don’t find out about yourself, you don’t find out about your relationship with learning, with text, until it’s put to the test. And then the responsibility of the institution is to find a way for the actor to negotiate that.

I’ve said it to these guys before – and I am sure every teacher at Toi Whakaari will say to them – that it may well be that you are an actor as well as being a director or writer or producer. There are lots of different skills that can be uncovered in this learning environment and you have to be very open as a teacher to people who bring different forms of magic and that is a big challenge for teachers. Everyone’s cultural history is so different. Their performance history is so different, their personal experience and desires. It’s so diverse. So you have to be structured but you have to be very open, and that’s a great personal challenge for a teacher.

You have been in this industry for years now as an actor, director, writer and now as an acting coach. What keeps you interested in this work?

Other people’s work. When I talk about reversing the flow, I try to apply that every day. I mean I still act and I really enjoy acting but, even in my acting, I am more interested in the other person’s acting than I am in my own.

And maybe that’s because I have been doing it for so long that I can genuinely feel unconstrained. I don’t care about what I look like, which is a lucky change. I used to when I was young and beautiful, but I am not young and beautiful anymore, so I have found huge freedom in growing older because I have gone, “Great, now it is just about the spirit, it is not about having to look a certain way”. And that is what has kept my interest in my own acting, especially on screen.

But, yeah, reverse the flow for me is being more interested in the other person than you are in yourself, just like a good conversation. It doesn’t matter who I am working with, that’s what I am aiming to enable.

Stuart’s and my film The Changeover stars Timothy Spall, Melanie Lynskey and Lucy Lawless — and also a 5 year old who has never acted before plus a teen newcomer. They all offer their own kind of magic and their own kind of challenge.

I work with Nicole Kidman and soon I am going to be working on a film alongside Rooney Mara and Joaquin Phoenix. But at the same time I am working with teenagers and kids at RATA Studios and trying to facilitate opportunities for them and I am working with first year drama students. They all have the capacity for brilliance in very different ways.

Something I really value and think is very special about the work that I bring, is my history with verbatim text. I always work with verbatim text. It is a great gift especially with young actors, because there is a magic to it. Over the past couple of weeks we have worked both with verbatim text and non-verbatim text and examined the difference. Using precision and then conversely using improvisation,  I’ll open up scenes and ask them to bring a verbatim dynamic to scenes that have been created by writers.

Verbatim text is incredibly valuable and useful because it’s the poetry of how real people speak. It’s a great tool for actors to learn how to respect text and characterisation. It’s like, “Wow, somebody really said this and they said it because they really felt it.”

Q&A by Emma Draper (Toi Acting Graduate-2009)

To find out more about Miranda Harcourt visit her website: http://www.mirandaharcourt.co.nz
For more information about Actor training at Toi Whakaari visit our Facebook page and Website:
https://www.facebook.com/toi.acting/

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Three students awarded scholarships for 2017 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/three-students-awarded-scholarships-for-2017/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/three-students-awarded-scholarships-for-2017/#respond Thu, 10 Nov 2016 21:11:25 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=11561 The board, staff, students and graduates of Toi Whakaari were thrilled to congratulate three of our best and brightest at this year’s graduation ceremony. Second year acting students Puawai Winterburn (Ngati...

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The board, staff, students and graduates of Toi Whakaari were thrilled to congratulate three of our best and brightest at this year’s graduation ceremony.

Second year acting students Puawai Winterburn (Ngati Raukawa, Ngapuhi, Ngati Porou) and Richard MacDonald (Tuhoe) were recipients of this year’s prestigious Bill Guest Awards and second year management student Olivia Chan received the inaugural Ruku Ao Award at the event on 9 November.

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Puawai Winterburn and Bill Guest

The Bill Guest Award is named in honour of the former Toi Whakaari Associate Director and covers a full year’s tuition fees. Thanks to increased generosity from school supporters we were able to offer two awards in Bill’s name this year. Students are nominated by their student peers (or staff) and are then required to write a response to their nomination.

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Bill Guest and Richard MacDonald

The Ruku Ao Award is a new initiative made possible through the generosity of Ruku Ao alumni who have come together to contribute towards the tuition fees for a student entering their final year at the school. Recipient Liv was also nominated by her peers and received her award from Lola Toppin-Casserly and Ma’anaima Lafoa’i, both of whom completed Ruku Ao in 2015.

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Lola Toppin-Casserly, Liv Chan and Ma’anaima Lafoa’i

 

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Caucus, Caucus, Harvest, Dawn production photos http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/caucus-caucus-harvest-dawn-production-photos/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/caucus-caucus-harvest-dawn-production-photos/#comments Thu, 27 Oct 2016 05:10:16 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=11414 Philip Merry’s photos of the Term 4 production, Caucus, Caucus, Harvest, Dawn have arrived and they are spectactular! The show runs until Saturday and you might still be able to get...

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Philip Merry’s photos of the Term 4 production, Caucus, Caucus, Harvest, Dawn have arrived and they are spectactular!

The show runs until Saturday and you might still be able to get a standby ticket.

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Costume Construction on RNZ National http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/costume-construction-rnz-national/ http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/costume-construction-rnz-national/#respond Mon, 26 Sep 2016 02:19:35 +0000 http://toiwhakaari.ac.nz/?p=10943 To help celebrate 10 years of Costume diploma graduates, Lynn Freeman from RNZ National’s Standing Room Only programme visited Toi Whakaari to talk to head of course Kaarin Macaulay and second...

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To help celebrate 10 years of Costume diploma graduates, Lynn Freeman from RNZ National’s Standing Room Only programme visited Toi Whakaari to talk to head of course Kaarin Macaulay and second year student Monique Bartosh about the the future of costume in New Zealand.

Monique Bartosh’s 2016 major work: “The Woodland Prince” (modelled by Will Moffatt and photographed by Stephen A'Court).

Monique Bartosh’s 2016 major work: “The Woodland Prince” (modelled by Will Moffatt and photographed by Stephen A’Court).

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